Friday, July 22, 2016

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for July 22, 2016


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Finding Your Ancestors in The United States Naturalization Records by Moises Garza, author of Mexican Genealogy
  2. Teaching Youth to Research with “Adopt-A-Family” Checklists AND Clueing In To Census Records by Diana Elder, author of Family Locket
  3. Colourize your photos instantly with this free tool by Gail Dever, author of Genealogy à la carte
  4. No right to sharing by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  5. Family Maps and Migration Routes Traced with New Tech Tools by Amie Bowser Tennant for Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems
  6. A DAUGHTER OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION by True Lewis, author of Notes to Myself
  7. One Reason to Do Cluster Research by Christine Manczuk, author of Ancestry Island
  8. Our ‘Relative Race’: Treasures Untold by Melissa Finlay, author of The Finlay Family
  9. The Smartest Genealogist has the Best Financial Plan by Amie Bowser Tennant for RootsBid Blog
  10. Did You Hear About the Great New Features From GenealogyBank.com? by Barbara Poole, author of Life From The Roots
  11. Writer's Block: Which of my Ancestors could write? by Intertwining Branches
  12. Second Cousins Are Magic by Dan Bodenheimer for Ancestry Blog
  13. Utah Celebrates Pioneer Day This Sunday by Gena Philibert-Ortega for GenealogyBank Blog

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Jana’s Place

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2016 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Theodor's Immigration Card

Theodor Reinacher

In a previous post, I shared the Immigration Card for my maternal great-grandaunt, Crecenciana Aurora Matus Villatoro. In that post I shared the news that I found the Immigration Card for Crecenciana's husband, Theodor Reinacher. I'd like to share his card with you today.

Here's the front of Theodor's Immigration Card.1



Information provided in this document:

Name: Theodor Reinacher
Admitted into the national territory in character (Immigration Status): Permanent
Nationality: German, Married
Father: Theodor Reinacher
Mother: Rosine Auguste Reinacher
Profession: Trade
ID Card: No. 506.547
Record No. 170.272 (Exp. 18/5/43
Residence: Rua Santo Antonio, 117
Employment: On his own
Local:

Theodor's residence is the same as Crecenciana's on her Immigration Card.

And here's the back of Theodor's Immigration Card.2


There's a lot of information on the back of this card. Since I don't speak or read Portuguese, I again turned to Google Translate for help.

Translation from Google:
Comments:
He landed in Rio de Janeiro, on 09.09.1924, by steam "Cap Norte"
On 4 Sep 1950 obtained duplicate portfolio by poor state of conservation of the primitive reason. 19 Sep 1950 communication residence for av. July 9 145 jobs for R. Libero Badaro 152 and 6. and revalidated three times, your card. Mod. 19 EB
He was enrolled in the Department R. G. Belo Horizonte Foreigners under the 42,221 as contained in the office communication in 616 of 24/04/61 that dept. CF
As you can see, this isn't an ideal translation. If any of my readers can help me translate the back of this card, please let me know. Thank you!

The first sentence, however, was clearer. It looks like Theodore arrived in Rio de Janeiro on 9 September 1924 via the SS Cap Norte. To see a photo of the Cap Norte, click HERE.

These Immigration Cards can provide valuable genealogical information. To search the Brazil, Sao Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902-1980, click HERE.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2016 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved



1 "Brasil, São Paulo, Cartões de Imigração, 1902-1980," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-41424-649-94?cc=2140223 : accessed 28 October 2015), entry for Theodor Reinacher. R > Reina-Reinnan > image 187 of 1126; Arquivo Público do Estado de São Paulo (São Paulo State Public Archives, São Paulo).


2 "Brasil, São Paulo, Cartões de Imigração, 1902-1980," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-41424-656-91?cc=2140223 : accessed 28 October 2015), entry for Theodor Reinacher. R > Reina-Reinnan > image 188 of 1126; Arquivo Público do Estado de São Paulo (São Paulo State Public Archives, São Paulo).

Friday, July 15, 2016

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for July 15, 2016


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Mad Dash to Mad Town by Sally Knudsen, author of Sally Searches
  2. Becoming an Accredited Genealogist: Levels 2 & 3 Study Group – Session 1, Test Preparation by Diana Elder, author of Family Locket
  3. #MyPioneerAncestor and the Mormon Overland Travel Database by Nicole Dyer, author of Family Locket
  4. Calling all indexers! by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  5. When the Family's Story Doesn't End Happily Ever After by Jacqi Stevens, author of A Family Tapestry
  6. How Genealogy and Pokemon GO Are Alike by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the Amy Johnson Crow Blog
  7. Contest: Win a Copy of Story of My Life workbook from Shop Family Tree by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  8. Interested in a Pursuing a Genealogy Credential? by Jenny Tonks, author of Jenny Tonks
  9. through small means by Allison Kimball, author of simple inspiration
  10. The Scholl Miracle by GatheringGardiners
  11. FUN WITH MY PHOTO PEDIGREE CHART by Linda Stufflebean, author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  12. Be The Source For Another Family by Emily Kowalski Schroeder, author of The Spiraling Chains
  13. Amazing Family Reunions by Jana Greenhalgh, author of The Genealogy Kids
  14. A (Possibly) Better Notebook Program than Evernote is Available Free of Charge by Dick Eastman, author of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter
  15. City Directories Narrow Down a Date of Death by Terri O’Connell, author of Finding Our Ancestors
  16. Post One: What I Learned Today by Jan Mitchell-McDermott, author of Genealogy! Just Ask!
  17. Great New Features at Family Tree DNA by Kitty Munson Cooper, author of Kitty Cooper’s Blog
  18. A New Meme: Our Immigrant Ancestors by Lorine McGinnis Schulze, author of Olive Tree Genealogy
  19. Cousin Jack: Kidnapped, Stowaway, Serial Naturalization Petitioner by Lara Diamond, author of Lara’s Jewnealogy
 
New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed It….My Contribution to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2016 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Crecenciana's Immigration Card

Crecenciana Aurora Matus Villatoro 

While I was using the FamilySearch app on my tablet, I clicked on the name of my maternal 2nd great-grandfather, Nicanor Matus. That family line is woefully lacking in information. I don't know who Nicanor's parents were or if he had any siblings. Anyway, I clicked on a hint and it was linked to this amazing document.


It's an Immigration Card for Crecenciana Aurora Matus Villatoro.1 She was married to Theodore Reinacher. Why did FamilySearch give me this document as a hint for Nicanor Matus? Because his name is on the document. Crecenciana is the youngest sister of my great-grandmother, Esther Matus Villatoro. Esther married my great-grandfather, Watson (Frederick) Emory Webster, a.k.a. "The Traveling Dentist" here on my blog.

Information provided in this document:

Name: Crecenciana Aurora Reinacher
Admitted into the national territory in character (Immigration Status): Permanent
Nationality: Mexican, Married
Father: Nicanor Matus
Mother: Raymunda Vilatoros Matus
Profession: Domestic
ID Card: No. 873.149
Record No. 203.454 (Exp. 2/12/43
Residence: Rua Santo Antonio, 117
Employment:
Local:

Crecenciana's Immigration Card is image 181 in this record set. I clicked on the right arrow that advanced to the next image when I was looking at this document. I'm glad I did because there is a back to this card, and it's been digitized as well. Here it is.


Unfortunately, I don't read or speak Portuguese, so I typed the sentence on this card into Google Translate and this was the result: landed at Santos in 1916, by steam, "Vestris"

I then did a Google search for Vestris and found an article on Wikipedia about the SS Vestris, which included this postcard image of the ship.
SS "Vestris"
Public Domain {PD-US}

That simple sentence on the back of Crecenciana's Immigration Card tells me that she arrived in Santos, Brazil in 1916, which means she would have been around 16 years old at the time she emigrated from Mexico to Brazil on the SS Vestris. Her older sister, Esther (my great-grandmother), was already living in Brazil and was the mother of four of her five children in 1916. Esther's fifth child was born in 1918. It must have been wonderful for Esther to have her sister living there too.

Tip: Make sure to look at the images before and after the document about your ancestor. You never know if there are additional pages.

I also found an Immigration Card for Crecenciana's husband, Theodor, in this same database on FamilySearch. I'll share that document in a future post.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2016 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved



1 "Brasil, São Paulo, Cartões de Imigração, 1902-1980," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-41424-708-56?cc=2140223 : accessed 28 October 2015), R > Reina-Reinnan > image 181 of 1126; Arquivo Público do Estado de São Paulo (São Paulo State Public Archives, São Paulo).

Friday, July 8, 2016

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for July 8, 2016


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Genealogy With Children Survey by Emily Kowalski Schroeder, author of Growing Little Leaves
  2. A Family Bible Mystery – Solved! by Deborah Lee Stewart, author of Between the Leaves Family Histories
  3. You can open those old corrupted document files! by Christine Blythe, author of Empty Nest Genealogy
  4. DR. JEREMIAH HALL WRITES TO GEORGE WASHINGTON ~ Celebrating Our Founding Fathers by Diane Gould Hall, author of MICHIGAN FAMILY TRAILS
  5. WHAT DOES “REASONABLY EXHAUSTIVE RESEARCH” REALLY LOOK LIKE? by Linda Stufflebean, author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  6. Original or Derivative Sources: What’s the Big Deal? by Diana Elder, author of Family Locket
  7. 6 Smartphone Apps To Keep Your Genealogy Organized by Lisa Lisson, author of Are You My Cousin?
  8. Why I Blog by Lara Diamond, author of Lara’s Jewnealogy
  9. Creating a Family Yearbook by Nicole Dyer, author of Family Locket
  10. Life of a Record from the Barbour Collection by Ancestry Insider, author of The Ancestry Insider
  11. The Adventures of "Little P" by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  12. What You Might Be Missing in Marriage Records by Amy Johnson Crow, author of Amy Johnson Crow Blog
  13. Quick tip – Emigrants sometimes went to a Notary by Yvette Hoitink, author of Dutch Genealogy
  14. Photo Booth by Debi Austen, author of Who Knew?
  15. Hundred-Year-Old Maple Walnut Tapioca Pudding Recipe by Sheryl Lazarus, author of A Hundred Years Ago
  16. Land Records Reveal Family and Sizable Estate by Family Sleuther, author of Family Sleuther

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contribution to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2016 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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