Saturday, September 23, 2017

Adding Yet Another Sweet Little Leaf to Our Family Tree


We added another sweet little leaf to our family tree. An adorable baby girl was born last month to our second-oldest son and his wonderful wife. Our new little granddaughter is just so beautiful!

It was awesome to add our new granddaughter's name to my Legacy Family Tree database. Our family tree continues to grow. 😊

We now have three grandchildren, with one more on the way this year. We are so excited!

Being a grandparent really is the best!

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved


Tuesday, September 19, 2017

RootsTech 2018 Now Open for Registration

Don't miss out on early bird discount prices for #RootsTech2018. See you there! 

The following is a press release from FamilySearch:

RootsTech 2018 Now Open for Registration

SALT LAKE CITY (19 September 2017)--FamilySearch International has announced that registration to RootsTech 2018 is now open. RootsTech is a popular 4-day annual family history and technology conference where individuals and families are inspired to discover, preserve, and share their family roots, heritage, and stories. The conference will be held February 28 to March 3, 2018, at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. For more information, go to RootsTech.org. (Find and share this announcement online in the FamilySearch Newsroom.)

In 2017 the growing event attracted more than 26,000 attendees in-person from all 50 U.S. states and more than 35 countries. Family Discovery Day, a free 1-day event held on Saturday as part of the conference, is also open for registration.

RootsTech 2018 will offer attendees a full lineup of inspiring and well-known keynote speakers; over 300 informative sessions, including hands-on computer labs taught by industry professionals and leaders; interactive activities and helpful exhibitors in the expo hall; and entertaining evening events. All are designed to inspire and empower personal family discoveries.

INNOVATION SHOWCASE

RootsTech 2018 officially begins on Wednesday, February 28, with class sessions beginning at 9:30 a.m. The all-new general session begins at 4:30 p.m. Steve Rockwood, CEO of FamilySearch International, will be the keynote speaker. Following Rockwood's address will be the all-new Innovation Showcase. The Innovation Showcase will feature the best new technology in the industry from around the globe. RootsTech is now accepting nominations for the 2018 Innovation Showcase from the public. The public can nominate its favorite family history related app, product, or service by using #RootsTechInnovation on Facebook or Twitter, or visit the Innovation Showcase page at rootstech.org. The submission deadline is October 15, 2017.

The showcase also offers attendees the opportunity to interact and connect with industry influencers, executives, and investors. Online viewers will also be able to vote for their favorite product or service during the live showcase event on Wednesday. (See RootsTech 2018 Grows to 4 Days, Introduces New Innovation Showcase.)

FAMILY DISCOVERY DAY

Registration for Family Discovery Day is also now open. The event takes place on Saturday, March 3, 2018, and is designed for families and members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This free and fun 1-day event includes inspiring messages from Church leaders; engaging classes for families, youth, and young single adults; and evening entertainment to inspire and help families and members discover, preserve, and share their family connections. Family Discovery Day attendees will also have access to all the interactive activities and exhibitors found in the RootsTech Expo Hall. Event details, including speakers and classes, will be made available soon at RootsTech.org. Registration is required.

PRICES

Early bird discount pricing is available for a limited time on 4-day passes at just $169 (a $100 discount). Single-day RootsTech passes are also available for $99. A 4-day Getting Started pass is only $69. All passes include access to the popular Expo Hall and morning keynote sessions.

RELATED

Watch archived sessions of RootsTech 2017

###
About RootsTech

RootsTech, hosted by FamilySearch, is a global conference celebrating families across generations, where people of all ages are inspired to discover and share their memories and connections. This annual event has become the largest of its kind in the world, attracting tens of thousands of participants worldwide.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

I'm Excited to be Serving as a RootsTech 2018 Ambassador!



I am so excited to announce that I've been invited to be a RootsTech 2018 Ambassador!

I served as a RootsTech Ambassador in 2016 and had a wonderful time attending the conference. I was invited to be a RootsTech 2017 Ambassador, but I wasn't able to serve that year because we moved into a our new home in early 2017.

What is RootsTech you ask? It's the world's largest family history and technology conference, and is hosted by FamilySearch.

RootsTech will be held in the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah from February 28 - March 3, 2018.

The theme for RootsTech 2018 is: Connect. Belong.

Registration for RootsTech 2018 opens on September 20, 2017.

To learn more about RootsTech 2018, click HERE.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope to see you at RootsTech 2018!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, August 17, 2017

I'm Still Here....

Ragged Point, California

Just wanted to write a quick note to let my readers know that I'm still here. My blog has been on hiatus for a while now. We've been busy around here. I've been spending time with family, and we're also trying to settle into our new home, specifically with decorating and furniture purchases, etc. That sure does take a lot of time and research (at least for me) with a brand new home. It's such a blank canvas. And I want to get it right. So, for now, our walls are blank (sigh) with no photos or artwork up yet. But, I'm hoping that we will figure all that out before too long.

So far, our summer has included trips to the Central California Coast, the birth of our second grandchild, spending time with family, hosting a baby shower for our daughter-in-law who is due any day now with our third grandchild, and the engagement of our oldest son. Such fun, happy and exciting times!

With the upcoming birth of our third grandchild any day now, my blog may still be a bit quiet in the near future. But hopefully, I will be getting back to my normal post schedule in the not too distant future.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Adding Another Sweet Little Leaf To Our Family Tree


This has been a very exciting week in our family. An adorable baby boy was born earlier in the week to our third-oldest son and his sweet wife. It was wonderful to add our new grandson's name to my Legacy Family Tree database. Our family tree is growing. 😊

We now have two grandchildren, with two more on the way this year. We are so excited!

Our new little grandson is so very cute. We've seen pictures of him, but haven't actually met him yet. Our son, daughter-in-law, and grandson live in another state. My husband and I are looking forward to meeting our sweet little newborn grandson in person.

Being a grandparent really is the best!

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, July 7, 2017

Jana's Genealogy Fab Finds for July 7, 2017



My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Mapping Your Ancestry: A Genealogist's Quick Guide to Google Maps by Michael Dyer, author of Family Sleuther
  2. Announcing: DearMYRTLE's new blog "Myrt's Musings" by Pat Richley-Erickson, author of DearMYRTLE
  3. Visualising Ancestry DNA matches–Part 1–Getting ready AND Visualising Ancestry DNA matches-Part 2-Loading files the first time AND Visualising Ancestry DNA matches-Part 3-Navigation and Presentation by Shelley Crawford, author of Twigs of Yore
  4. Treasuring Our Homes and Our Families by Peggy Lauritzen, author of Anxiously Engaged
  5. Family Reunion Bingo Games! by Amberly, author of TheGenealogyGirl
  6. School Records from Sparta: Finding Your Ancestors as Children by Carol Kostakos Petranek, author of Spartan Roots
  7. Dear Randy: How Best to Save Your Genealogy Work? by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  8. MAPPING HOMESTEADS by Susie, author of Genealogy Journey
  9. THE JULY GENEALOGY BLOG PARTY: DNA DISCOVERIES by Elizabeth O'Neal, author of My Descendant's Ancestors
  10. Family History Travel with Kids – July Blog Link Up by Nicole Dyer, author of Family Locket
  11. Finding the Like-Minded by Jacqi Stevens, author of A Family Tapestry
  12. 2017 NFHM Blogging Challenge by Alex Daw, author of Family Tree Frog
  13. Independence Day 2017: Celebrating Your Genealogy Freedoms by Thomas MacEntee, author of Abundant Genealogy
  14. DAR MAGAZINE DIGITAL ARCHIVE by Linda Stufflebean, author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  15. Was My Ancestor a Deserter? by Miriam J. Robbins, author of AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contribution to the Blogosphere Last Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

My Revolutionary War Patriot Ancestor ~ Dr. Luther L. Waterman



Today is Independence Day here in America. Happy Independence Day!

I always thought I didn't have any family connections to the founding of America since my Dad's side of the family are from Norway and Sweden. And all I knew about my Mom's side of the family is that they were from Brazil. But, after the death of my maternal grandfather, Debs Warren Webster, I saw a photo of my 2nd great-grandfather, Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster. I learned that Ebenezer had served in the American Civil War. That was news to me! I hadn't ever seen his photo or heard his name before.

Not only did I have a Civil War ancestor, I learned that I had a Revolutionary War ancestor named Dr. Luther L. Waterman. He was my maternal 4th great-grandfather.

Luther served as a surgeon in the Revolutionary War. I'm grateful for his service.

I've written about Luther before on my blog. I'd like to share my previous posts about this patriot ancestor on this Independence Day. For those of you who haven't read about Luther before, I hope you enjoy getting to know him better. I was thrilled to see his signature on a document from 1776. I shared that document in the second post on this list.

  1. Military Monday ~ Revolutionary War Surgeon: Luther Waterman
  2. My 4th Great-Grandfather's Signature on a Revolutionary War Document ~ Dated August 23, 1776
  3. 52 Ancestors: #37 ~ Phebe Barker – Wife of a Revolutionary War Surgeon

Happy Independence Day!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, June 30, 2017

Jana's Genealogy Fab Finds for June 30, 2017



My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Using FOOD to Connect Kids to Ancestors by Jana Greenhalgh, author of The Genealogy Kids
  2. FamilySearch to Discontinue Microfilm Distribution Services by Thomas MacEntee, founder of Abundant Genealogy
  3. The end of microfilm by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  4. The End of FamilySearch Microfilm Loans: What It Means for You by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the Amy Johnson Crow Blog
  5. Genealogy Finds in Your Own Home by Lori Samuelson, author of Genealogy At Heart
  6. Family Food Story by Allison Kimball for FamilySearch Blog
  7. Research Like a Pro, Part 3: Where Did They Live? AND Back to the Basics with U.S. Census Research – Part II by Diana Elder, author of Family Locket
  8. Ancestors' Ages at Parenthood by Michael Dyer, author of Family Sleuther
  9. Ancestors’ Ages at Parenthood by Lark M. Dalin Robart, author of Eight Roads to Montana
  10. No Image Available – Maybe There is One – Part 2! by Mary Kircher Roddy, author of Searching for Stories
  11. 50 ESSENTIAL WEBSITES FOR MY GENEALOGY RESEARCH by Linda Stufflebean, author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  12. Indexing with Children by Camille, author of The Mommy Genealogist
  13. These Old Fire Insurance Maps Reveal a Surprising Amount of Genealogy Data by Tony Bandy for Family History Daily
  14. Genealogy Scan Along Week 2: Scan Your Photos by Denise May Levenick, author of The Family Curator
  15. A Trio from the Tribe by Jill Ball, author of GeniAus
  16. DNA Proves Me Right! by Devon Noel Lee, author of the Devon Noel Lee Blog
  17. Western State Lunatic Asylum and Martha Saul by Nancy Loe, author of Sassy Jane Genealogy
  18. Look What I Found Cleaning Up My Trees! by Valerie Hughes, author of Genealogy With Valerie
  19. The Archive Lady: Preserving the Family Bible by Melissa Barker for Abundant Genealogy

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere Since My Last Fab Finds Post

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, June 26, 2017

FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm


FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm


SALT LAKE CITY, UT (26 June 2017)—FamilySearch, a world genealogy leader and nonprofit, announced today its plans to discontinue its 80-year-old microfilm distribution service. The transition is the result of significant progress made in FamilySearch’s microfilm digitization efforts and the obsolescence of microfilm technology. The last day for ordering microfilm will be August 31, 2017. Online access to digital images of the world's historic records allows FamilySearch to service more people around the globe, faster and more efficiently. See Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org and Frequently Asked Questions for additional information. Find and share this announcement online in the FamilySearch Newsroom.

A global leader in historic records preservation and access, FamilySearch and its predecessors began using microfilm in 1938, amassing billions of the world’s genealogical records in its collections from over 200 countries. Why the shift from microfilm to digital? Diane Loosle, Director of the Patron Services Division said, "Preserving historic records is only one half of the equation. Making them easily accessible to family historians and researchers worldwide when they need them is the other crucial component."

Loosle noted that FamilySearch will continue to preserve the master copies of its original microfilms in its Granite Mountain Records Vault as added backup to the digital copies online.

As the Internet has become more accessible to people worldwide over the past two decades, FamilySearch made the decision to convert its preservation and access strategy to digital. No small task for an organization with 2.4 million rolls of microfilm in inventory and a distribution network of over 5,000 family history centers and affiliate libraries worldwide.

It began the transition to digital preservation years ago. It not only focused on converting its massive microfilm collection, but also in replacing its microfilm cameras in the field. All microfilm cameras have been replaced with over 300 specialized digital cameras that significantly decrease the time required to make historic records images accessible online.

FamilySearch has now digitally reproduced the bulk of its microfilm collection—over 1.5 billion images so far—including the most requested collections based on microfilm loan records worldwide. The remaining microfilms should be digitized by the end of 2020, and all new records from its ongoing global efforts are already using digital camera equipment.

Digital image collections can be accessed today in three places at FamilySearch.org. Using the Search feature, you can find them in Records (check out the Browse all published collections link), Books, and the Catalog. For additional help, see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org.

Transitioning from microfilm to digital creates a fun opportunity for FamilySearch's family history center network. Centers will focus on simplified, one-on-one experiences for patrons, and continue to provide access to relevant technology, popular premium subscription services, and restricted digital record collections not available to patrons from home.

Centers and affiliate libraries will coordinate with local leaders and administrators to manage their current microfilm collections on loan from FamilySearch, and determine when to return films that are already published online. For more information, see Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm.


About FamilySearch


FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Family History Blogging Can Help Others Find Their Ancestors


I am so excited to share with you that a previously unknown cousin contacted me recently to tell me some wonderful news.

He left a comment here on my blog. His comment began with this sentence:
"I was so happy to stumble onto your blog, as it has helped me finally crack the mystery of who my three times great grandfather was."
Isn't that awesome!? This previously unknown cousin and I share an ancestor in my Norwegian family line. My cousin's ancestor was one of the brothers of my third great-grandfather, Michael Christian Christopherson. My cousin also said,
"...and thanks to you I now have their parents names as well :) Thanks!"
Wow! You're very welcome cousin!

My cousin went on to say that I was a good DNA match with his grandmother on GEDmatch. Yay!

My new cousin's comments made me feel so good! It really is worth all of the time and effort to write about my ancestors in my blog. Not only is blogging about my ancestors beneficial to me, it's also helpful to others.

Have you had any cousins contact you because you shared your family history in your blog?

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, June 9, 2017

Jana's Genealogy Fab Finds for June 9, 2017



NOTE: There will not be a Fab Finds post next week due to family activities. Thank you!

My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. GeneaBloggers announces GeneaBloggersTRIBE
  2. It’s not just about blogging… by Pat Richley-Erickson for GeneaBloggersTRIBE
  3. New GeneaBloggersTRIBE Badge for Your Blog or Website by GeneaBloggersTRIBE
  4. GeneaBloggersTRIBE - Answering your questions by Jill Ball, author of GeniAus
  5. Dear Genealogy Bloggers, I love you! AND Salt Lake Tribune Negative Collection by Amberly, author of TheGenealogyGirl
  6. Another Internet Surprise by Valerie Hughes, author of Genealogy With Valerie
  7. USING SURNAME DISTRIBUTION MAPS by Linda Stufflebean, author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  8. Another gem for researching relatives who served in the Soviet Army during WWII by Vera Miller, author of Find Lost Russian & Ukrainian Family
  9. Research Like a Pro, Part 2: Analyze Your Sources by Diana Elder, author of Family Locket
  10. What is a ‘Professional Genealogist’? by Amie Bowser Tennant, author of The Genealogy Reporter
  11. New Facebook Group: Historical City Directories by Miriam J. Robbins, author of AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors
  12. The mailman brought letters Dad wrote 72 years ago by Becky Jamison, author of Grace and Glory
  13. Our Ancestors and Their Gardens by Melissa Barker, author of A Genealogist In The Archives
  14. “LITTLE BYTES OF LIFE” IS NOW “MY DESCENDANT’S ANCESTORS” by Elizabeth O'Neal, author of My Descendant's Ancestors
  15. The Norwegian Digitalarkivet with new design by Martin Roe Eidhammer, author of Norwegian Genealogy and then some
  16. Mastering Genealogical Proof & Mastering Genealogical Documentation by Colleen G. Brown Pasquale, author of Leaves & Branches
  17. TRACING MY FAMILY TREE AT THE AGE OF SEVEN by David Allen Lambert, author of The Past Finder
  18. Formal citations: Do it for those who follow by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  19. Genealogy Blogging Like It's My Birthday! by Michael Dyer, author of Family Sleuther 

Previous "May I Introduce To You" Interviews on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere Since My Last Fab Finds Post

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

My DNA Ethnicity Estimate From MyHeritage

Earlier this week MyHeritage announced their new and improved Ethnicity Estimate.

I decided to check out my results and found them very interesting.

Under the DNA tab, I clicked on the Ethnicity Estimate tab and my Ethnicity Estimate list and corresponding world map appeared.


Here's my Ethnicity Estimate list.


And here's my Ethnicity Estimate map.


When I placed my cursor over a region in my Ethnicity Estimate, the region's color darkened and a box with the Ethnicity Estimate region and percentage appeared.


At the top of the page above the map is a "Play Intro" tab.


When I clicked on it, a separate tab on my computer opened and a video started playing.

The video began like this:


And ended with this:


This cool animated video revealed "who I am" according to my ethnicity estimates. As each region was listed and highlighted on the map, representative music from that region played. It was pretty neat.

When the video ended, this map appeared.


At the bottom of the map is a "Play again" button to view the video again.


Here's another interesting feature. To learn more about a region in your ethnicity estimate, simply click on that region in the map or in the list.

I did that for my Central American region and this is the screen that appeared.


It will be interesting to compare my DNA ethnicity estimates from MyHeritage to my results from Ancestry and Family Tree DNA. I will likely share those comparisons in an upcoming post.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, May 26, 2017

No Genealogy Fab Finds Post This Week


Hello wonderful readers!

Just a quick post to tell you that there will not be a Genealogy Fab Finds post today. I've been dealing with shoulder/upper arm pain this week. I'm not sure yet if it's tendinitis, frozen shoulder, or what. It seems to be feeling better than before, but earlier it was difficult to use the computer mouse.

Hopefully Genealogy Fab Finds will resume next week. Thank you for your patience.

Have a great weekend!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, May 22, 2017

Debs and Willis Webster's Vintage Matchbook Collection

During a visit to my mom's house, she brought out this cool bag filled with vintage matchbooks. It belonged to my Grandpa and Grandma, Debs Warren Webster and Willis Quillin Webster.




I talked to my youngest brother and he remembers seeing these matchbooks. In fact, he remembers our Grandpa Webster letting him examine them. I wondered if my grandparents had collected these during their travels. He affirmed that by saying, "They collected each and every one of them from their many travels around the nation."

How cool is that!?


I'm so intrigued by these vintage matchbooks. My grandparents didn't ever smoke, so I don't know why they chose to collect matchbooks during their travels. But I'm glad they did collect them and that they kept them through the years. Not only are they interesting historically, they also give me a glimpse into the lives of my grandparents and where they traveled. My youngest son had a great idea to use these to create a map of where my grandparents traveled.

My plan is to scan these vintage matchbooks and share them here in this blog.

Stay tuned!

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, May 19, 2017

Jana's Genealogy Fab Finds for May 19, 2017


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. A Fond Farewell by the Ancestry Insider
  2. Research Like a Pro, Part 1: What’s Your Question? by Diana Elder, author of Family Locket
  3. New! Jewish Geneabloggers List by Emily Garber, author of (going) The Extra Yad
  4. Fun Family History Activities for Father’s Day – #FHforChildren Blog Link Up June 2017 AND BYU myFamily History Youth Camp by Nicole Dyer, author of Family Locket
  5. Witnesses as clues to relationship by Martin Roe Eidhammer, author of Norwegian Genealogy and then some
  6. Skeletons in the Closet by Candice McDonald, author of Finding Your Canadian Story
  7. Cousin Jack--Add Being Deported and Deserting to His Story! by Lara Diamond, author of Lara's Jewnealogy
  8. Those Darn County Lines! by Diane Anderson, author of This Hoosier's Heritage
  9. Playing Favorites: Burton W. Cook by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  10. Slave Name Roll Project: Estate Record of Peter G Evans by Andrea Kelleher, author of How Did I Get Here? My Amazing Genealogy Journey
  11. Making Letters Come Alive by Mary Kircher Roddy, author of Searching for Stories
  12. Kerry Landed Estate Courts by Kay Caball, author of My Kerry Ancestors
  13. HOMES IN WHICH I’VE LIVED by Linda Stufflebean, author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  14. Reclaim the Records is fighting for genealogists by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  15. Creating Free, Beautiful Charts on TreeSeek by Amberly, author of TheGenealogyGirl
  16. Am I The Only One??? by Valerie Hughes, author of Genealogy With Valerie

Last week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed It….My Contribution to the Blogosphere Last Week

Jana's Place

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, May 12, 2017

Jana's Genealogy Fab Finds for May 12, 2017


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. In search of another Caroline… by fhtess65, author of writing my past
  2. Remembering the Babies: Locate Birth and Death Records for Genealogy by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen for The Genealogy Reporter
  3. Including Family Traditions by Valerie Hughes, author of Genealogy With Valerie
  4. My Ethnicity Fractions – Based on My Tree AND My DNA Results – How do they compare to my tree? (Updated) by Amberly, author of thegenealogygirl
  5. Consider Yourself Invited! Contribute to the Honor Roll Project for memorial Day 2017 by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy
  6. Mother’s Day Memory Jar for Mother by Vera Marie Badertscher, author of Ancestors in Aprons
  7. A Personal Milestone for Me and Cyndi's List by Cyndi Ingle, author of Cyndi's List Blog
  8. When the county clerk does you a favor (or not) by Michele Simmons Lewis, author of Ancestoring
  9. The Golden Rule of Genealogy Volunteerism by Donna Cox Baker, author of The Golden Egg Genealogist
  10. Was your ancestor a miner? by Dayna Jacobs, author of On Granny's Trail
  11. Researching Your Civilian Conservation Corps Relative by Nancy Loe, author of Sassy Jane Genealogy
  12. Photographs in the Archives by Melissa Barker, author of A Genealogist In The Archives
  13. Six Years and (Still) Counting by Jacqi Stevens, author of A Family Tapestry
  14. I Write Like . . . . - SNGF by Nancy Messier, author of My Ancestors and Me
  15. Get Started with Web Indexing by James Tanner, author of Rejoice, and be exceedingly glad...
  16. Facebook vs Blogging: The Pros and Cons by Alona, author of Lonetester HQ
  17. Tuesday's Tip: Genealogy, Free or Fee--Ask for Help by Marian B. Wood, author of Climbing My Family Tree
  18. Down the DNA Rabbit Hole – Collateral Lines by Deborah Sweeney, author of Genealogy Lady
  19. DNA Toolbox by Elizabeth Handler, author of From Maine to Kentucky
  20. The “Secret” Codes on Death Certificates That Can Tell You How Your Ancestors Died by Melanie Mayo for Family History Daily
  21. How Family History Has Changed Me by TheHipsterGenealogist, author of The Hipster Genealogist Blog
  22. What Is The Greatest Thing About A Genealogy Conference? by John D. Tew, author of Filiopietism Prism
  23. Mothers Who Remember by Nicole Dyer, author of Family Locket

Last week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed It….My Contribution to the Blogosphere Last Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

How to Add Hashtags in Legacy Family Tree 9


Last Friday I watched the "Discover the new Legacy Family Tree 9" webinar. Geoff Rasmussen demonstrated some of the new features in the Legacy 9 Deluxe Edition. One of the features I really like in this version of Legacy is the Hashtag feature.

Basically, users of Legacy 9 Deluxe can add hashtags to their ancestors and then create lists using the hashtags. For instance, I can add a hashtag for each of my ancestors who lived in Minnesota. Then I can create a list of the people in my database who ever lived in Minnesota. How cool is that!?

Since watching Friday's webinar, I've had way too much fun adding hashtags to my ancestors. And I've only just begun. There's no limit to how many hashtags we can create. And that is awesome. Our database can be totally personalized to our needs.


And now, I'll show you how to add hashtags to an ancestor in Legacy 9.

See the hashtag icon that the red arrow is pointing to in the image below? It's grey, which means there are no hashtags for my 2nd great-grandfather, Ole Anthon Christophersen

To add hashtags, I clicked on the grey hashtag icon.


This box popped up. As you can see, I already have a list of hashtags that I've created.


Ole was born in Norway, so I checked that box.


To see what other hashtags are on the list, I used scroll bar on the right.


Ole also lived in Minnesota after he immigrated to the United States, so I checked that box.


I then clicked on the "Save" button.


I also added a couple other hashtags that were already on my list: "Immigrant to America," and "Direct Line: Jana's."

Now I'll show you how I added a new hashtag to the list that pertains to Ole. To do that, I clicked on the "Add" button.


The "Add a Hashtag" box appeared. 


After he immigrated to America, Ole lived in Minnesota. I didn't have a "Residence: Norway" hashtag yet, so I added that in this box.


Then I clicked on the "Save" button.


And there it is. The new "Residence: Norway" hashtag has been added to the list. And it was automatically checked for Ole.


I then clicked on the "Save" button.


Now that I added hashtags to Ole in my database, the hashtag icon turned blue. Also, when I hovered my cursor over the blue hashtag icon, all of Ole's hashtags are shown. Pretty cool.


In an upcoming post, I'll show you how to create a Hashtag List using the Hashtag Search feature.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, May 5, 2017

Jana's Genealogy Fab Finds for May 5, 2017


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Major Changes At GeneaBloggers.Com by Thomas MacEntee, founder of GeneaBloggers
  2. Is Genealogy Blogging Dead? by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the Amy Johnson Crow Blog
  3. Typo – Farmlingham not Framlingham! by Simon Last, author of Charnwood Genealogy
  4. How They Do It: Pat Richley-Erickson (DearMYRTLE) by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  5. Family History Storytime – Preschool Books and Lesson Plans by Nicole Dyer, author of Family Locket
  6. Daily Life Binders: Organization Meets Genealogy by Devon Noel Lee, author of A Patient Genealogist
  7. Granma’s Tapioca Cream by Julie Preston, author of The Keeper of Stories
  8. Livestreaming Your Conference Experience-An Opportunity to Be a Part of #NGS2017GEN by Cheri Hudson Passey, author of Carolina Girl Genealogy
  9. Favorite Sources: World War I Draft Registration Cards AND Minnesota Digital Newspaper Hub by Liane Jensen, author of Genealogy Mom
  10. The Archive Lady: Preserving Old Negatives by Melissa Barker for GeneaBloggers
  11. Don’t be an online genealogist by Michele Simmons Lewis, author of Ancestoring
  12. “What is Social History and Why Should a Genealogist Care?” AND Genealogy Alphabet Challenge – “A is for Archives” by Krista, author of The Great Ancestor Dig
  13. Just Because They’re Buried There Doesn’t Mean They Died There by Mary Kircher Roddy, author of Searching for Stories
  14. Can You Find Family Histories in the Archives? Yes You Can! by Melissa Barker, author of A Genealogist In The Archives
  15. The Mercantile: Where Our Ancestors Shopped by Melissa Barker for The Genealogy Reporter
  16. Norwegian patronyms by Martin Roe Eidhammer, author of Norwegian Genealogy and then some

Last week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, April 21, 2017

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for April 21, 2017



NOTE: There will not be a Fab Finds post next week due to upcoming family activities. Fab Finds will resume on May 5, 2017. Thank you!

My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Life Lessons Learned from Old School Records by Patricia Desmond Biallas, author of GeneaJourneys
  2. Family history tip for BUSY parents … by Jana Greenhalgh, author of The Genealogy Kids
  3. Legacy Family Tree Version 9 Released - Lots of New Features! AND Getting Hints on Legacy Family Tree Version 9 Profiles by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  4. Releasing Isaac, Agg, and Hannah and Two Slave Name Projects by Diana Elder, author of Family Locket
  5. What Happened to Genealogy Blogging? AND Follow Up & Reflection on ‘What Happened to Genealogy Blogging?’ AND Genealogy Blog Reading Philosophy AND Not Quite “On the Clock,” but Getting There  by Julie Cahill Tarr, author of Julie's Genealogy and History Hub
  6. Are We Nearing the End of Genealogy Blogging? by James Tanner, author of Genealogy's Star
  7. A New To-Do List  by Elise Ann Wormuth, author of Living in the Past: A Family History
  8. Natural Disasters and Family Misfortunes: Galveston 1900 by Wayne Shepheard, author of Discover Genealogy
  9. Win a Free DNA Test on National DNA Day AND Save on DNA Education for National DNA Day by Amie Bowser Tennant, author of The Genealogy Reporter
  10. Genealogy Throw Back Idea That Worked! by Lori Samuelson, author of Genealogy At Heart
  11. Was my Ancestor Insane or Did They Have Encephalitis? by Jennifer Bullard, author of The Genealogy Laboratory
  12. 10 Ways Busy Parents Can Make Time for Family History by Nicole Dyer, author of Family Locket
  13. DNA Day Sales 2017 by CeCe Moore, author of Your Genetic Genealogist
  14. NEW GENEAGEM: THE GATEWAY TO OKLAHOMA HISTORY AND 52 DOCUMENTS IN 52 WEEKS #15: DANISH LAEGDSRULLER -ARMY RECORDS by Linda Stufflebean, author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  15. The Forgotten Federal Census of 1885 Can Be Found Online for Free by Melanie Mayo for Family History Daily

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed It….My Contribution to the Blogosphere Last Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2017 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Printfriendly

ShareThis

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...